Diagnosing Acne

Larry Jaeger is an expert at diagnosing acne conditions. He has over twenty-five years experience as a leading board certified Dermatologist in New York  in diagnosing acne.

How Acne is Diagnosed?acne-stats-did-you-know

Most people can easily self-diagnose mild acne, which can be treated at home using over-the-counter products. However, if you are unsure if what you are experiencing is acne, or if your acne seems severe, see your dermatologist. Acne is diagnosed by a simple visual inspection by your doctor. There is no test for acne.

What is Acne?

Larry Jaeger describes the symptoms and grades of acne outbreaks.

acne treatments: what is acne?

Acne Grades of Severity | Common Look-a-likes:

When diagnosing acne, dermatologists classify it into four grades.

They evaluate the types of comedones present, amount of inflammation present, breakout severity, how widespread the acne is and what areas of the body are affected.

AcneStages

Grades of acne are classified as follows:

Acne: Grade I – The mildest form of acne. The skin will display blackheads, whiteheads or milia, and occasionally minor pimples. There is no inflammation. Grade I acne can usually be cleared with over-the-counter treatments.

Acne: Grade II – Considered moderate acne. A greater number of blackheads and whiteheads are on the skin. Papules and pustules are more frequently found. Grade II acne may also be treated with over-the-counter products. However, if there is no improvement after six to eight weeks, consult your doctor.

Acne: Grade III – Moderate to severe acne. The difference between Grade II and Grade III acne is the amount of inflammation present. Papules and pustules will be more numerous and there will be a greater amount of redness and inflammation found on the skin. Nodules are often present. This type of acne should be evaluated by your dermatologist.

Acne: Grade IV – The most severe grade of acne, the skin will display many pustules, nodules, and cysts. Blackheads and whiteheads are numerous. There is pronounced inflammation, and breakouts likely extend to areas other than the face. Grade IV acne, also called cystic acne, must be treated by a dermatologist.

Types of Acne Breakouts

Larry Jaeger comments that some skin conditions can look remarkably similar to acne, although their causes and treatments are different. Do you have acne or an acne look-alike condition? If you are unsure, it is always wise to consult with a doctor instead of self-diagnosing acne.

acne myths: Diagnosing Acne

Common skin conditions that can be mistaken for acne include:

Rosacea – Causes red, flushed skin with papules and pustules, especially in the nose and cheek area.

Folliculitis – Bumps or pustules caused by inflammation of the hair follicle.

Keratosis pilaris – Small, rough, “goose-flesh” like bumps most often found on the upper arms, thighs and buttocks, and sometimes the face.

Miliaria rubra – Small red bumps on the surface of the skin caused by excessive heat exposure. Also known as heat rash.

Dr. Larry Jaeger of New York is an expert in the diagnosis and treatment of skin conditions and is board certified in dermatology and dermatological surgery. Visit Dr. Larry Jaeger and the Advanced Dermatology Associates team at 200 Central Park South, Suite 107 in New York City.

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Things You Shouldn’t Pop

Pimple Popping: Acne, Blisters And Scabs

It doesn’t matter how many times we’ve been told to stop touching, picking and popping zits — most of us wouldn’t let a pus-filled whitehead ruin our day. Those skin things you shouldn’t pop includes pimple, popping acne, blisters and even scabs. Things You Shouldn’t Pop.

Things You Shouldn't Pop - Facial Acne

Things You Shouldn’t Pop

Even though we know the consequences of picking at our skin — the scarring, the bleeding and the pus — dermatologist Dr. Shannon Humphrey says, realistically, telling people to stop won’t actually do a thing.

“We all live in a real world, and sometimes it’s difficult to function with a big whitehead on your face,” says Dr. Shannon Humphrey, director of continuing medical education and clinical instructor, department of dermatology and skin science at the University of British Columbia. “But there has to be a balance. Be gentle and consult a dermatologist to avoid trauma to the skin.”

Popping Acne – Improperly Managing Skin Problems

Even if popping your breakouts reduces the visibility of bumps, it’s actually not getting rid of the problem. Along with scars (which take longer to disappear), the urge to pick can also cause infections, redness and inflammation. And when you’re using your nails or any type of medical tool, you’re also ripping your skin, according to YourBeauty.com. If that wasn’t enough, oily fingers and dirty nails can lead to further redness.

And the need to pop has also become a pleasure — even if it grosses most people out. On YouTube, thousands of videos are uploaded for this sole purpose, letting viewers both cringe and enjoy pimples of all sizes popped in high definition. This account alone has over 170,000 views and 30 videos (though we do warn you before clicking that it can get pretty detailed). There are also videos of ‘extreme pimple popping,’ which as the name implies, features videos of abnormally giant pimples or cysts being popped by professionals.

Humphrey adds she’s not surprised about this so-called trend. “I understand the fascination and deep satisfaction of a successful extracting,” she tells The Huffington Post Canada.

She says if you do have a habit of touching any condition, including scabs or blisters, hygiene is important. Avoid using dirty tools, and remember that alcohol, which can be used for sterilization, also strips your skin’s natural barriers. “In general I would want to minimize the use of tools, especially sharp ones,” says Humphrey. “Nothing should pierce the skin, it should have a round edge.”

Things You Shouldn't Pop - Aging Skin Tips

Five Reasons You STILL Have Acne

You’re One of the Unlucky 50 Percent

What’s happening: Half of all women will suffer from acne at some point in their post-teen years, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. Acne is most often triggered by hormonal fluctuations during puberty (as you remember) as well as during pregnancy, perimenopause, menopause and even when you change birth control methods. The five reasons you STILL have acne.

AcneDiagram

Five Reasons You STILL Have Acne


What it looks like:
Cyst-looking bumps that hurt like the dickens and last forever. While younger acne takes over the T-zone, adult pimples usually appear on the chin and neck and along the jawline. They’ll be at their worst just before you get your period.

What to try: As a quick fix, your dermatologist may inject the site with inflammation-calming cortisone. To prevent these types of breakouts in the future, s/he may talk to you about spironolactone, an oral medication that blocks the androgen hormones often responsible for adult acne.

You’re Searching for the Elixir of Youth

What’s happening: There are countless products to prevent and treat the signs of aging, but sampling several of them at once may inadvertently lead to pimples. In addition, many antiaging products have heavy-duty moisturizers to help with age-related dryness, and those can clog pores if you have acne-prone skin.

What it looks like: You’re not just spotty but also uncharacteristically shiny.

What to try: If you have acne-prone skin, look for products that are “oil-free” or “non-comedogenic” and try one at a time. She also recommends keeping an eye out for these ingredients, which are more likely to aggravate acne: lanolin, squalene, alcohols (isopropyl myristate), oils (mineral oil, coconut butter, oil) and sodium lauryl sulfate.

You Don’t Have Adult Acne. (You Have This.)

What’s happening: The good news: You don’t have acne! The bad news: You may have perioral dermatitis, a skin condition that’s common among middle-age women and is often mistaken for acne. Experts don’t really know what causes it, she adds, but it’s a variant of rosacea and has been linked to the prolonged use of topical steroid creams and inhaled prescription steroid sprays, overuse of some heavy face creams, skin irritants and (weirdly) fluorinated toothpaste.

What it looks like: A red, bumpy rash around the mouth and lower face. It can also be scaly or irritated-looking.

What to try: Dermatologists usually treat this condition with a course of antibiotics or anti-inflammatories.

You’re Overwhelmed by Adult Responsibilities

What’s happening: Stress and exhaustion cause your cortisol levels to spike, and this can result in an increase in testosterone as well as pimply skin, Edible “stress relievers” you’re getting from the vending machine (i.e., cans of soda, bags of M&Ms) aren’t helping, as foods like these, with a high glycemic index, can aggravate acne.

What it looks like: These are usually the same pimples you remember from your youth: red, white and annoying all over (they often appear in clusters).

What to try: Topical ointments with benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid, the gold standards for treating teen acne, can be too harsh for adult skin. They often cause dryness, which can be a problem for women who are dealing with an age-related lack of moisture. Look for acne products with a lower concentration of pimple-busting active ingredients. (And try to get to bed earlier.)

Dirty-Pillow-Talk: Five-Reasons-You-STILL-Have-Acne

What’s Touching Your Face.

You Recently Renovated Your Powder Room

What’s happening: You finally have your own private sink and vanity…which means you’re paying more attention to your skin than ever before.Adult patients tend to spend more time in front of the magnifying mirror and are more likely to deal with breakouts by picking obsessively or slathering on multiple treatments.

What it looks like: Inflamed, red, scabby, positively volcanic. And because cell turnover slows with age,the picked pimples will take even longer to heal and are more likely to leave scars in woman of a certain age.

Five Reasons You STILL Have Acne - Skin Care Tips

 

Source: Huffington Post | Five Reasons You STILL Have Acne

HPV Treatment For Men

Larry Jaeger is a Board Certified Dermatologist and the founder and owner of Central Park Medical Associates in New York. Larry Jaeger provides private and discreet testing and treatment for all HPV related diseases: HPV Treatment For Men: HPV – What We All Need To Know.

HPV Treatment for Men: HPV Numbers

Does HPV infection increase cancer risk in men?

According to Larry Jaeger, the specific risks are different for men. Most of the time, HPV infection doesn’t cause any signs or symptoms in either sex, although some types of HPV cause genital warts.

Typically, the immune system eliminates the virus without treatment within about two years. Until the virus is gone, you can spread it to your sex partners.

Throat, Head & Neck Cancers: HPV

Larry Jaeger indicates that certain types of HPV, known as high-risk types, may cause persistent infection, which can gradually turn into cancer. Malignancies that can be caused by HPV include cancers of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus and oropharynx — the back of the mouth and upper part of the throat.

Men who have HIV — the virus that causes AIDS — and men who have sex with other men are at particular risk of anal, penile and throat cancers associated with persistent HPV infection. The rate of oropharyngeal cancers has been on the rise recently, especially in men.

HPV_vaccine_infographic_HPV Treatment_for_Men

HPV In Men: Treatment & Vaccine

Larry Jaeger relates that men can prevent the types of HPV that cause most genital warts and anal cancer by receiving an HPV vaccine. These were originally approved as a cervical cancer vaccine for girls and young women, and they’re now approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the prevention of anal, vulvar and vaginal cancers, too.

The vaccines are recommended for males ages 9 to 26. The best time to get the vaccine is before sexual activity begins. Although these vaccines are not yet approved for preventing HPV-related penile and oropharyngeal cancer, recent studies suggest that these vaccines may be effective for preventing these cancers as well.

You may also lower your risk of contracting HPV by using a condom every time you have sex. However, condom use isn’t considered a substitute for HPV vaccination in those who are eligible for the vaccine.

10 myths about HPV: HPV Treatment for Men

New York Health Care| HPV Treatment For Men

 

HPV Vaccine Effectiveness Against Cancer

Larry Jaeger provides excellent dermatological diagnoses and treatments for patients at Central Park Medical Associates in New York. For over twenty-five years, Dr. Larry Jaeger has treated patients suffering from HPV related skin disorders and reveals new evidence of the effectiveness of HPV vaccines against cancer. “HPV Vaccine for Treating Cancer.”

HPV Vaccine Treating HPV Cancer

How do HPV vaccines work?

Like other immunizations that guard against viral infections, HPV vaccines stimulate the body to produce antibodies that, in future encounters with HPV, bind to the virus and prevent it from infecting cells. The current HPV vaccines are based on virus-like particles (VLPs) that are formed by HPV surface components. VLPs are not infectious, because they lack the virus’s DNA. However, they closely resemble the natural virus, and antibodies against the VLPs also have activity against the natural virus. The VLPs have been found to be strongly immunogenic, which means that they induce high levels of antibody production by the body. This makes the vaccines highly effective.

The VLP technology that is used in the HPV vaccines was developed by NCI and other scientists. NCI licensed the technology to Merck and GSK to develop HPV vaccines for widespread distribution.

HPV Vaccine Treating Cancer - HPV Statistics

How effective are HPV vaccines?

Larry Jaeger maintains that HPV vaccines are highly effective in preventing infection with the types of HPV they target when given before initial exposure to the virus—which means before individuals begin to engage in sexual activity. In the trials that led to approval of Gardasil and Cervarix, these vaccines were found to provide nearly 100 percent protection against persistent cervical infections with HPV types 16 and 18 and the cervical cell changes that these persistent infections can cause. Gardasil 9 is as effective as Gardasil for the prevention of diseases caused by the four shared HPV types (6, 11, 16, and 18), based on similar antibody responses in participants in clinical studies. The trials that led to approval of Gardasil 9 found it to be 97 percent effective in preventing cervical, vulvar, and vaginal disease caused by the five additional HPV types (31, 33, 45, 52, and 58) that it targets (18).

To date, Larry Jaeger reports that protection against the targeted HPV types has been found to last for at least 8 years with Gardasil (19) and at least 9 years with Cervarix (20). The duration of protection with Gardasil 9 is not yet known. Long-term studies of vaccine efficacy that are still in progress will help scientists better understand the total duration of protection.

Who is eligible for HPV vaccines?

A clinical trial of Gardasil in men indicated that it can prevent anal cell changes caused by persistent infection and genital warts (21). Analyses of data from women participating in a clinical trial of Cervarix found that this vaccine can protect women against persistent HPV 16 and 18 infections in the anus (22) and the oral cavity (23).

The HPV vaccines are all designed to be given to people in three doses over a 6-month period. However, one study showed that women who received only two doses of Cervarix had as much protection from persistent HPV 16/18 infections as women who received three doses, and the protection was observed through 4 years of follow up (24). Even one dose provided protection. In other studies, young adolescents given two doses of Cervarix or Gardasil were found to have as strong an immune response as 15-to-25-year-olds who received three doses (25, 26). Based on the evidence to date, the World Health Organization has recommended two doses as the standard delivery for these vaccines, although in the United States three doses are still recommended.

Central Park Medical Associates is a private and discreet testing and treatment center for all STD related conditions. HPV Vaccine Treating Cancer at (212) 246-0800.

Larry Jaeger is committed to providing safe and painless testing and treatment for HPV and can provide the best treatment options on a patient by patient basis.